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Bite-Size Insights: How can leaders develop organizational resilience?

Jun 23, 2020 | 00:00

00:00 00:00

Episode Description

The only thing certain right now is change. The way we work, the way we live are going to continue to change and adapt. We’ve heard from many leaders who are trying to foster resilience, which is the capacity to recover quickly from challenges. Think 90’s classic, “I get knocked down, but I get up again”. No matter who we are, we have all faced difficulties over the past few months.

As leaders look to develop re-entry strategies and update their policies and procedures, the word resilience can’t be ignored. It’s the trait that gives us the ability to keep going when the light at the end of the tunnel may not be clear.

Joining us to share their thoughts on what this means to leaders is Hakemia Jackson, a cultural strategist, an executive coach, and partner with Bravely, and Jeff Smith, a psychologist and the Director of 15 Five's Best Self Academy.

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Episode Transcription

[00:00:03] Hey Insigths listeners, Nicole here and thanks so much for joining me for this week's Bite Size Insights. Empowering people leaders with best in class information. In 10 minutes or less. The only thing that's certain right now is change.

[00:00:16] The way we work, the way we live are all going to continue to change and adapt. And we've heard from many leaders who are trying to foster resilience, which is the capacity to recover quickly from challenges. Think the 90s classic. I get knocked down, but I get up again and let's be real. We've all had to face some real difficulties over the past few months from a global pandemic to civil unrest. No matter who you are. There's been an impact as leaders look to develop reentry strategies and update their policies and procedures. The word resilience can't be ignored. It's that trait that gives us the ability to keep going, even when the light at the tunnel may not be clear. Joining us to share their thoughts on what this means to leaders is Lukemia Jackson, a cultural strategist and executive coach and a partner with Bravely, and Jeff Smith, a psychologist and the director of Fifteen Five's Best Self Academy. As we jump into the conversation. Keep this question in mind. How can we become more resilient?

[00:01:18] I think first we have to identify where I want to go. So that means what does that future look like for me? And then I can fill in the gaps with the necessary steps for for the employee. I think finding back work life harmony again, it goes to operating from that place. Meaning being connected. Communicating. There's an actual resiliency model out there that you could research and implement in your day to day. I'm also identifying, you know, some of those breaking points and challenges. I think some of us live in denial. We think we can take everything on. You know, we want to be all knowing and all we're doing because of fear of whatever and losing a job. Right. Security, whatever that is. We have to truly understand, you know, whereas really my bottom, because I don't want to cross over that line. I want to make sure I'm still productive and effective every day. Working from a place a phone is what truly makes me feel on a day to day. And then organizationally, what systemic things do I have in place that promote resilience? So specifically, what what's going on in the black community and marginalized communities? How am I supporting my colleagues doing this time that have to do with wondering if their children or husbands that are going to come home at night? And yet I still have to make sure I hit this this particular, you know, deadline. And my offering up safe spaces for them. Do I have any policies in place that truly support them so that they can be resilient and agile, really connecting and similar to what Santiago was saying with exercising that whole leadership? What does it look like for me intellectually? What does it look like for me spiritually? And what does it look like for me emotionally? That's really important. That's another thing that we really hone in on at bravely is just connecting to the core of the resource and not necessarily coaching them for the role, but coaching them to their potential.

[00:03:19] And I think one of the one of the mistakes that can sometimes take hold in organizations or for individuals in these circumstances is only focusing on removing or avoiding the negative things that are going on vs. focusing on positives as well. So I think for an organization, it's important to develop people's strengths, focus on recognition, the power of progress, layering and encouragement and coaching, focusing on new opportunities that may come with some challenges as well, and growth and development as well as post-traumatic growth. So making the time to learn from the struggle and living in this bukha world that we live in is really important as well. So some of the things that I think are important are again focusing on strengths, but then also reminding people that like human beings are resilient. Right. One of my favorite psychologists is Victor Frankl. And this idea of you have the choice, you have the choice to choose, like you have a choice to choose on a day to day basis how you react to what's going on around you and take that reaction and take the energy that comes from it and apply it and really new and exciting ways. So, again, focusing on what's positive and all this human capability, resilience is what a really powerful character, strength and creativity and being able to get through the struggle. But then as well as focusing on avoiding or removing a negative as well.

[00:04:49] Thank you for joining this week's Bite Size Insights. I hope you learn something new. And if there's a topic that you want to make sure we address.

[00:04:56] Submit your feedback to me at emplify dot com slash questions. That's emplify dot com slash questions.