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Bite-Size Insights: How can we connect our culture to the customer experience?

Jul 14, 2020 | 00:00

00:00 00:00

Episode Description

One of the first things discussed when the pandemic hit was the health of the business. For many, that measure of health focused on two stakeholders: existing customers and current employees. Yet, the reality is often times the customer experience is at odds with the company’s culture. As you can imagine, this can have a ripple effect detrimental to an organization’s success.

Imagine how a disengaged employee interacts with a customer who needs something resolved. Or imagine your customer getting wind of internal turmoil due to poor culture. As we continue to tighten budgets and evaluate every expense, exceptional customer experience cannot be jeopardized due to a lack of engagement.

In this week’s bite-size we’re talking about breaking down the silos between these two foundational aspects of any business. Sharing his thoughts is the CEO of Emplify, Santiago Jaramillo.

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Episode Transcription

[00:00:03] Hey, Insight's listeners, Nicole here and thanks for joining me for this week's Bite Size Insights Empowering People Leaders with best in class information. In 10 minutes or less, one of the first things to be discussed when the pandemic hit was the health of the organization.

[00:00:17] And for many, that measure of health focuses on two key stakeholders, existing customers and current employees without customers or the people to provide the service or offering. There is simply no business. It seems pretty straightforward, right? Well, the reality is oftentimes we find the customer experience to be at odds with the company's culture. And as you can imagine, this can have a ripple effect detrimental to an organization's success. Think about it. Imagine how a disengaged employee interacts with a customer who need something result or think of a customer getting wind of an internal turmoil due to poor culture. As we continue to tighten budgets and evaluate every expense, exceptional customer experience cannot be jeopardized due to a lack of engagement. So for this week's Bite Size, we're talking about breaking down the silos between these two foundational aspects of any business, sharing his thoughts as CEO of Emplify. Santiago, how amnesia.

[00:01:19] It's asking employees for their own input of how they could better serve customers. It's amazing the richness of idea that is yielded by asking in a safe way. Employees to contribute that. There's a recent survey by Maritz, about three thousand Full-Time U.S. base employees and about eight percent of employees at the company's policies and procedures make it easy to satisfy customers. Ninety two percent of folks don't believe that the structural things put in place by the company allow those individuals to serve the customer well.

[00:01:55] And so that question of what start, stop, keep, what can we start doing that we're not doing yet? What should we stop doing? What policy should we remove to better enable you and empower you to solve customer problems?

[00:02:09] That's kind of that idea of Zappos did this right and empowered each of their team members, customer service team members to spend up to X amount. It goes exactly fifty dollars or five hundred dollars that there's this empowerment to where it wasn't a decision tree of 10 rules about how much you could refund. But if they found out that I think there was a famous story about Zappos customer that their loved one has recently passed away and the Zappos customer service employee took it upon themselves to go by that customer flowers. And as they found out through the call and what an incredible, delightful, you know, experience on top of delivering a great shoe purchasing experience or just asking employees. But I think one thing that we are assuming in that is that employees feel safe to speak and that is psychological safety. When Google did a study about what is the best predictor in their most high performance teams. The thing that they found the most that was the most common among the high performance seen was psychological safety.

[00:03:05] This idea that people feel safe to speak up and give opinions and tell ideas without fear of retribution or harm coming to them or their career, that the safety of speaking up, even if it's going to be an idea that may not be popular or may disagree with a management perspective. So we must first create environments that are psychologically safe and then we can begin to ask really targeted questions to teammates about the people closest to the customer, about what we can change structurally as an organization that is getting in the way of them delivering better customer experiences.

[00:03:41] You know, in the early days at Amplify. We would ask an open ended question, how could we improve our culture, that equivalent? And you would get a mess of stuff. And then we begin to ask very specific questions that measured engagement. And then we would do a follow up to that. Very specific stories. A manufacturing company teach Marine had an employee turnover issue and the specific we know our measurement of employee engagement was able to uncover that it was a utilization gap for the production team. These are the highly skilled welders on the floor making the boat parts. And they asked a very specific question, which is how could we improve your sense of utilization? Meaning you can give more you have more to give in to contribute to this company. What's keeping you from contributing more? And how can we help you contribute more to to deliver a better product? And those welders? It's a very targeted question. The richness of the insight, I think, is directly correlated with the thoughtfulness, framing and specificity of the question. And so they add they were asked that and they said, well, listen, most of our day is not spent to welding, which is what we love doing and came here for. And we're measured against. We are mostly moving heavy metal sheets from one place to another in the manufacturing facility and our backs hurts. We're missing our welding targets and we're have a higher level of defects, you know, that we're happy with. And so, interestingly enough, those folks had had asked their supervisor for better equipment. And, you know, that supervisor didn't have the authority to make that purchase. Now, all of a sudden, management got wind of it. They bought a forklift and a leveling table, the suggestion of that team and all of a sudden their employee turnover plummeted in a good way. It went from one hundred percent to two to zero percent for about nine months. After that, after they took a couple actions, their employee engagement went up significantly and they were to produce more parts with less defects. At the end of the day, it was a huge win for the customer and it was a huge win for the employees themselves.

[00:05:36] Thank you for joining this week's bite sized insights, curious, what have you found to align the customer experience to the company culture?

[00:05:43] Give us your feedback and amplify dot com slash questions. That's mpl i f why dot com flash. Questions.