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Bite-Size Insights: What can leaders do to support self-care for their teams?

Jul 21, 2020 | 00:00

00:00 00:00

Episode Description

If you’ve traveled on any airline, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the monotonous but occasionally entertaining monologues about safety procedures. You know, exits located in the front and back of the plane, there’s a flotation device under your seat, and...in case of an emergency...“Put on your own oxygen mask before assisting those around you.” Hopefully, you’ve never been in this position but the reasoning behind this policy also applies outside of an airplane. Clearly you can’t help someone else if you’re incapacitated and without oxygen.

In this week’s bite-size, we are asking leaders to put their oxygen mask on first and learning how they can encourage self-care for themselves and their teams. Sharing their thoughts are Hakemia Jackson, a cultural strategist, executive coach, and partner with Bravely, Jeff Smith, a psychologist and the Director of 15 Five's Best Self Academy, and Santiago Jaramillo, CEO of Emplify.

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Episode Transcription

[00:00:03] Hey, Insight's listeners, Nicole here and thanks for joining me for this week's Bite Size Insights Empowering People Leaders with best in class information. In 10 minutes or less.

[00:00:13] If you've traveled on any airline, you are undoubtably familiar with the monotonous, yet occasionally entertaining monologues about safety procedures. You know, exits located in the front and back of the plane. There's a flotation device under your seat. And in case of an emergency. Put on your own oxygen mask before assisting those around you. Now, hopefully you've never been in this position. But the reasoning behind this policy also applies outside of an airplane. Clearly, you can't help someone else if you're incapacitated and without oxygen. That's why in this week's Bite Size, we are asking leaders to put on their oxygen mask first and learning how they can encourage self care for themselves and for their teams. Sharing their thoughts are Hakimi Jackson, a cultural strategist, executive coach and partner with Bravely Jeff Smith, a psychologist and the director of 15 Five's Best Self Academy. And Santiago Jaramillo, CEO of Emplify.

[00:01:15] I've seen organizations use that bay tied well-being to metrics. So think about you wanting to say, hey, I need to take off today. So if you recognize that your team member is running hot. That actually is connected to your manager's performance. So if you know that your resource is running hot, maybe you could implement flexible schedules or you Penneshaw, they're taking that time off to improve their well-being. Or you could offer up different, you know, solutions that will aid them in a way that matters most to them. I think what's really important is that we're looking for this and I'll be all paying that supports everyone. And we have to really connect with our staff to see what truly works for them and support them in a manner that is healthy for them and their well-being.

[00:02:06] Building on what's already been said, one of my favorite constructs that I learned about this year is this idea of healthy selfishness, that it's healthy to do things like self care. It is actually like a real psychological construct. There's people out there measuring this and doing research on it and like it's OK to say, hey, I need some time for myself or I need a sick day. I saw someone in the chat said, like, I'm listening to you with our eyes closed and outside, like taking a date with myself. And like that it's OK to put your own oxygen mask on first. And normalizing that with starting at your senior leadership level, I think is really effective and important. If your CEO is saying like, hey, you know, I'm stressed out, too, and I need some time with my family or I need to take a Friday off and not work 90 hours this week. That's one of the things that can make it OK for other team members to model that same behavior.

[00:03:03] You know, one of the things probably end of April, I realized that I was really tired and I was really exhausted. We sprinted in April to react to Cauvin and change plans and take care of our teams. And we did a sprint to release a free product for managers to figure out the well-being of their team. And I realized that I'm not afraid, but I was embarrassed of taking a day off for myself as a CEO of the company, because what what am I got? I'm not going anywhere. Right. I'm not going to break. I'm not going to a specific place. So this is going to be like, hey, I'm not going to work today. I'm wanna watch Netflix all day. And I realize that if I'm feeling that way, I can't imagine what my team how they feel about the permission they have to take it. And by the way, we're a self managed PTO policy. So like it's like take what you need and let us know and play with your manager, but like, take what you need. So that happen. And the next day we reviewed our own amplify results of our own team. We obviously use our own tools to understand that employee engagement, how our team is doing. And when a couple of drivers for us are low, it says burnout is about to happen. So there is a rest driver which we measure. And so rest was low, meaning I can't take time to come back refreshed and re energized. Competency was low. I don't think I can hit my goals in front of me. And there's a third one. I forgot what it was, but basically when those three are tied together, it just basically means burnout is about to happen because you don't think you can hit your goals. You're in. You're really tired. And so when you're like looking at a hill that, you know, you can't climb, but that you're, you know, it's not going to be OK if you don't climate. We decided to give everybody Fridays off at Amplify for the month of May and sort of force the company to shut down one day a week and figure out how to do customer calls and rescheduling those pieces. But the second thing that I think is more important is Jeff hit on this, which was it's not only mental when the job demands exceed our mental capacity. I think a big part of it that is understated is in our shared understanding is the emotional part of things, which is just emotional burnout. And I think for for what we have seen as is mindfulness organizations are investing in the mindfulness of the team, focusing on the positive. That is a contributor to a mindset that is more resilient. And so how do we grow resiliency as organizations? And resiliency is the ability we can challenge and tough, difficult stuff and somehow transmute it like change it, transform it, alkalis it into growth for ourselves. What an incredible organizational capacity for a team to have and for a person to have, which is the more shit we take in, the better we get that. That is incredible. And so how do we build more resiliency as individuals and as teams and its organizations? And I think the mindfulness and resiliency part of it are very much tied together since so much of who we are or not intellectual beings. But we are, I think at our core, more emotional beings than we give ourselves credit to, who at times have been civilized enough to use our heads more than our emotions.

[00:06:08] Thank you for joining this week's Bite Size Insights. Be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode and give us your feedback at emplify.com/questions.